DBS Airborne Division – Company Bee; Operation: Black Locust Sawdust Recon

army beeWhile Doug was milling Black Locust sawlogs for our friends at Suburban Mills (located in Tyler Hill, PA); he found  himself working alongside a swarm of Apis Melifera; the Honey Bee.   They were feverishly rifling through and collecting the Black Locust sawdust made while milling.  As you can see in the video, the members of “Company Bee” did their part in making sure no portion of the Black Locust tree went to waste.  Bees are very efficient in that way.  Some bee experts say in early spring, bees may be running low on sugar in their hive and are in search of any pollen or dust product that may contain sugar, and Black Locust wood is very sweet and aromatic.  This tree is famous for producing a fruity and fragrant honey, with various ranges in color, from clear to dark and is considered a major honey plant in eastern USA.  But don’t confuse the Black Locust tree with Honey Locust, which oddly enough produces very little, if any honey.  Apparently, Honey Locust was used by early Indian tribes as an ingredient in food preparation which made certain dishes taste sweeter.  Another theory for this sawdust gathering event is the bees will chew the dust, and after mixing it in their mouths, it becomes a basic cellulose fiber that the bees can use to build and expand their hives.  Either way, bees are clever! Check out the video of these busy little guys, doing what they do best.   Click Link:  https://youtu.be/aNlH5kqZV7Q

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